Webinars on the Futures of Humanity and the Planet: Learning to Become

The current global pandemic has changed anticipated futures across the globe. The COVID-19 crisis is both world-shattering and world-makingthere is a widely shared sense that humanity is at a defining moment for rethinking the future.

Reflection on probable/anticipated and possible/alternative futures is well underway within UNESCO’s Futures of Education: Learning to Become initiative and this series of webinars further explores the possible deep and fundamental transformations in how societies, politics, economies and even cultures may be organized in the future.

Surfacing ideas and debates
to reimagine development, knowledge and learning
in a world of profound transformations.

Upcoming webinars

Webinar Coming Soon

 

Evidence, Knowledge and Research in the Context of COVID-19: Fostering Equitable Partnerships for Mutual Learning 

Beyond its direct impacts on education, the COVID-19 crisis has brought to the fore challenges and opportunities for reimagining education research and knowledge for sustainable futures.  

Evidence, knowledge and research are distinct concepts and yet interrelated. The emphasis on ‘evidence-based’ policies in education and international development is sometimes critiqued for relying on knowledge produced through unequal power relations and inequitable research partnerships. 

Existing literature and the COVID-19 pandemic highlight the need for locally generated, tested and adapted evidence, stressing the importance of understanding the dynamics of specific contexts. The pandemic has exposed new and existing structural vulnerabilities of education, differential impacts on learning and the need to building more inclusive and resilient arrangements for education and learning at all levels.

Join us this Friday! Attendees will be invited to share comments and questions throughout the discussion. 30 minutes will be dedicated to Questions & Answers. 

Simultaneous interpretation from English to French will be available.

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Keith Holmes will moderate the webinar, setting the scene by exploring the nature of evidence, knowledge and data, and the power imbalances in education research partnerships and networks, by questioning whose agendas are prioritized, and who has ownership of research and evaluation processes. 

Prachi Srivastava will consider key assumptions and institutions that underlie education systems in the context of the COVID-19 pandemic. Her paper explores the legitimization of knowledge, with reference to inclusion/exclusion, and identifies conceptual shifts needed for meaningful actions in the current crisis. 

Vainola Makan, Rafael Mitchell and Wendy Pekeur will discuss enabling structures and spaces for equitable knowledge co-creation and capacity mobilization within international research partnerships. 

As discussant, Joel Samoff will then provide critical reflections on the papers presented. Together, the panel will reflect on steps towards socially responsible approaches to knowledge generation, such as equitable capacity exchange, mutual learning, self-critique, and equitable partnerships and networks. Finally, the panel suggests ways forward in evidence, knowledge and research for sustainable futures.

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  • Moderator’s remarks: 
    Keith Holmes, UNESCO Future of Learning and Innovation Team

  • Education and the Pandemic: assumptions, institutions, and a way forward

  • Prachi Srivastava, Faculty of Education, University of Western Ontario, Canada

  • Opening spaces for equitable, locally-responsive knowledge co-creation: Lessons from Transforming Education for Sustainable Futures

  • Vainola Makan, Associate of Ubuntu Rural Women and Youth Movement, South Africa

  • Rafael Mitchell, Co-Director of the Centre for Comparative & International Research in Education (CIRE), University of Bristol, UK 

  • Wendy Pekeur, Founder of Ubuntu Rural Women and Youth Movement, South Africa

  • Discussant’s remarks: 

  • Joel Samoff, African Studies Center, Stanford University, United States of America

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More information about the speakers:

Keith Holmes is a Programme Specialist in UNESCO's Future of Learning and Innovation team. Keith is currently involved in education research and foresight activities, especially on higher education, notably through the UNITWIN/UNESCO Chairs Programme.

Prachi Srivastava is tenured Associate Professor specialising in education and international development. Currently, Dr. Srivastava is working on the global education emergency caused by the COVID-19 pandemic. She is leading a high-level policy brief for the T20 Task Force on COVID-19, which will feed into the G20 Summit, and has also provided recommendations for the Ontario Ministry of Education based on this work. Dr. Srivastava's long-term research interests are: non-state private sector engagement in education; global philanthropy and impact investment; private schooling and education privatisation; and global education policy and the right to education in the Global South.

Rafael Mitchell is Co-Director of the Centre for Comparative & International Research in Education (CIRE) at the University of Bristol. His research and teaching focuses on education in Africa, and addresses the processes of schooling and school improvement for disadvantaged groups, and inequalities in knowledge production on education. Rafael serves on the leadership team of the UK GCRF research network Transforming Education for Sustainable Futures, which is supporting around 60 Southern-led research projects in Rwanda, Somalia/Somaliland, South Africa and India. He previously worked at the University of Cambridge where he helped to establish the African Education Research Database.

Vainola Makan is a feminist and gender activist who has worked in the non-profit sector for more than 20 years. She was the lead researcher for the assessment of work done by Ubuntu Rural Women and Youth in the time of Covid-19, which was supported by the Transforming Education for Sustainable Futures South African hub based at Rhodes University. She has used participatory methods to explore the interlinkages of social justice, gender and environmental issues in society with groups of people who traditionally excluded from knowledge and material resources are impacted. She initiated a Covid-19 Women Support Group, and has been involved in building several grassroots women's movements and is currently an associate of Ubuntu and active in Sisterhood Movement.
 
Wendy Pekeur has more than 20 years of experience in land activism and labour rights with women on farms. She was the General Secretary of the first women led trade union in South Africa Sikhula Sonke. She worked as an organizer for Women on Farms Project. She is a Trainer in Labour Law and does arbitration and conciliation at the CCMA for unlawful dismissals on farms and evictions of farm dwellers. She serves as a Human Rights Monitor during Covid-19 for the South African Human Rights Commission and is the Founder of Ubuntu Rural Women and Youth Movement and is currently the Coordinator.
 
Joel Samoff has a background in history, political science, and education, he studies and teaches about education and development. From Kilimanjaro coffee farmers in Tanzania to militant bus drivers in Ann Arbor Michigan to the education activists of Namibia and South Africa, the orienting concern of his work has been understanding how people organize themselves to transform their communities. Concerned with public policy as well as research, and especially with the links between them, Samoff works regularly with international agencies and NGOs involved in African education. Formerly its North America Editor, he serves on the Editorial Board of the International Journal of Educational Development and on the editorial boards of the Comparative Education Review, the Journal of Educational Research in Africa, and the Southern African Review of Education.

 

Past webinars

Friday 25 May

Learn more about the recently launched report "Thinking Higher and Beyond: Perspectives on the Futures of Higher Education to 2050" through this webinar organized by the International Institute for Higher Education in Latin America and the Caribbean (IESALC). This discussion panel include Professor Ahmad Y. Majdoubeh, University of Jordan; Professor Emerita Takyiwaa Manuh, University of Ghana; Professor Rajani Naidoo, University of Bath, UK; Professor Dzulkifli (Dzul) Razak, International Islamic University Malaysia, Professor Patricia Mariella Ruiz Bravo Lopez, Pontifical Catholic University of Peru. 

The recording here below is available with English and Spanish subtitles.

 

Monday May 17, 4.30pm - 5pm CET

Our planet and its inhabitants are under increasing pressure: Human-induced climate change, limited and recklessly exploited resources, rising temperatures and sea levels, pollution and shrinking biodiversity are just a few of the issues governments and populations face around the world. The current Covid-19-pandemic amplifies existing weaknesses and challenges in our societies.

Education for Sustainable Development (ESD) is crucial to empower people to have the knowledge, skills, values and attitudes to meet these crises and other sustainable development challenges. 

We invite you to watch the roundtable discussion on the Futures of Sustainability and the Futures of Education that UNESCO organized in the framework of the World Conference on Education for Sustainable Development and the Futures of Education initiative. 

Panelists included Suresh Gautam, Kathmandu University (Nepal), Veronica Pacini-Ketchabaw, University of Western Ontario (Canada), Iveta Silova, Arizona State University (USA) and Sobhi Tawil, Division of the Future of Learning and Innovation, UNESCO.

 

Thursday April 22, 3pm - 4.30pm CET

This webinar was co-organized by the Office of the Envoy of the Secretary-General for Youth (United Nations) and UNESCO. It is part of a series of webinars organized within the framework of UNESCO's Futures of Education initiative, a global initiative to rethink how knowledge and learning can shape the future of humanity and the planet.

We still have a long way to go in removing all the barriers that prevent persons with disabilities from having equal rights to access and benefit from quality education. It is bearing in mind these challenges that we organized on Thursday 22nd April a webinar on the futures of education for persons with disabilities. 

4 inspiring panelists examined effective practices and inclusive policies for students with disabilities and neurodivergent learners. It represented a great opportunity to exchange encouraging practices. Youth voices were be particularly highlighted thanks to the participation of several young speakers. Simultaneous interpretation will be provided in English, French and Spanish, as well as international sign language and Kenyan sign language.

 

English version (with English interpretation)

 

French version (with French interpretation)

 

Spanish version (with Spanish interpretation)

Tuesday 20 April, from 1pm to 2.30pm (Paris time)

The unprecedented disruption to schools caused by the COVID-19 pandemic, has been impacting over 63 million teachers worldwide. This crisis has further reinforced the need to ensure continuous teacher professional development, psychological support and socioemotional learning, a reinforcement of teacher's rights and working conditions, as well as ongoing research and assessment of rapidly changing teaching and learning.

We invite you to watch a unique dialogue on the futures of teaching in the Arab States and beyond, organized by the International Task Force on Teachers for Education 2030, in collaboration with Hamdan Foundation. The 90-minute consultation provided a space for dialogue between members of the International Commission on the Futures of Education and teachers and lead experts from the region and beyond. Recording available here below in English, French and Arabic.

 

English version (English interpretation)

 

French version (French interpretation)

 

Arabic version (Arabic interpretation)

 

El jueves 1 de abril, 16:00-17:30 CET

En los últimos seis meses, la Red de Escuelas Asociadas de la UNESCO (redPEA) ha movilizado varios miles de profesores, alumnos y padres alrededor del planeta para llevar a cabo reflexiones en común sobre la educación en el futuro. Lo invitamos a descubrir sus perspectivas a través del video sobre este webinar, disponible a continuación. Esta discusión fue moderada por Fernando REIMERS, Profesor de Educación Internacional en la Escuela Superior de Educación de la Universidad de Harvard y miembro de la Comisión Internacional sobre los Futuros de la Educación. 

 

Mercredi 31 mars, 14h - 15h30 CET | Wednesday 31 March, 14:00 – 15:30 CET

Au cours des six derniers mois, le réseau des écoles associées de l'UNESCO (réSEAU) a mobilisé plusieurs milliers d’enseignants, d’élèves et de parents du monde entier afin d’entamer une réflexion sur les futurs de l’éducation. Nous vous invitons à en apprendre davantage sur les bonnes pratiques et les idées innovantes qui sont ressorties de ces échanges à travers la vidéo du webinaire disponible ci-dessous, webinaire qui a été modéré par Abdelbasset Ben Hassen, président de l'Institut Arabe des Droits de l'Homme et membre de la Commission internationale sur les futurs de l’éducation.

 

 

Over the past six months, the UNESCO Associated Schools Project Network (ASPnet) has mobilized several thousand teachers, students and parents from around the world to start thinking about the futures of education. We invite you to learn more about the good practices and innovative ideas that emerged from these exchanges through the video of the webinar available below, webinar which was moderated by Abdelbasset Ben Hassen, President of the Arab Institute of Rights of man and member of the International Commission on the Futures of Education.

 

Friday, 26 March, 14:00 – 15:00 CET

In the last six months, UNESCO’s Associated Schools Network (ASPnet) has mobilized several thousands of teachers, students and their parents from across the globe to engage in joint reflections about education in the future. We invite you to learn more about perspectives from these audiences as they reflect on how education needs to be reimagined looking towards 2050 and beyond. This particular discussion has been moderated by Fernando Reimers, Professor of International Education at the Harvard Graduate School of Education and Member of the International Commission on the Futures of Education. Please find the recording of the online discuss here below.

 

Thursday March 11, 3pm - 4.30pm (Paris time)

This webinar co-organized by the Office of the Envoy of the Secretary-General for Youth (United Nations) and UNESCO explores how technology can contribute to more equitable and inclusive education systems. 

Thousands of people joined 15-year-old scientist Gitanjali Rao, TIME Magazine’s Kid of the Year and several young innovators & entrepreneurs in a fascinating discussion on how technology can contribute to make education systems more accessible for ALL.

We are pleased to invite you to learn more about this major online dialogue through this recording:

 

 

Jueves 11 de marzo (15:00 - 16:30 CET)

Este seminario web coorganizada por la Oficina del Enviado del Secretario General para la Juventud (Naciones Unidas) y la UNESCO explora cómo la educación indígena y el conocimiento tradicional a una educación más relevante e inclusiva, y cómo pueden contribuir al futuro que queremos. Hace parte de una serie de seminarios web organizados en el marco de la iniciativa Los futuros de la educación de la UNESCO, una iniciativa mundial para replantear cómo el conocimiento y el aprendizaje pueden conformar el futuro de la humanidad y del planeta.

Miles de personas se unieron a la científica de 15 años Gitanjali Rao, la Niña del año de la revista TIME y a varios jóvenes innovadorxs y emprendedorxs en una fascinante discusión sobre cómo la tecnología puede contribuir a crear sistemas educativos más accesible para TODXS.

Nos complace invitarlo a conocer más sobre este importante diálogo en línea a través de esta grabación:

 

 

Jeudi 11 mars, 15h - 16h30 (heure de Paris)

Ce webinaire co-organisé par le Bureau de l'Envoyée du Secrétaire général pour la jeunesse (Nations Unies) et l'UNESCO explore comment la technologie peut contribuer à des systèmes éducatifs plus équitables et inclusifs. Il fait partie d'une série de webinaires organisés dans le cadre de l'initiative de l'UNESCO "Les futurs de l'éducation", une initiative mondiale visant à repenser la manière dont la connaissance et l'apprentissage peuvent façonner l'avenir de l'humanité et de la planète.

Des milliers de personnes ont rejoint la scientifique de 15 ans Gitanjali Rao, nommée Enfant de l'année par le TIME Magazine, et plusieurs jeunes innovat-rices/eurs et entrepreneur.e.s dans une discussion passionnante sur la manière dont la technologie peut contribuer à rendre les systèmes éducatifs plus accessible pour TOUS.

Nous sommes heureux de vous inviter à en savoir plus sur ce dialogue en ligne à travers la mise à disposition de cet enregistrement.:

 

Wednesday 24th February, 17 – 18:30 (GMT)

This online event is part of a series of webinars on the topic of decolonising education for sustainable futures convened by the UNESCO Chair in inclusive, good quality education and the Centre for Comparative and International Research in Education (CIRE) at the University of Bristol. The aim of this series is to consider how ideas about the future of education can benefit from current efforts to decolonise education. Using an open, roundtable approach, this event aimed to bring together policy, practitioner and academic communities. It included a panel of speakers with plenty of time for audience participation in the spirit of dialogue.

This panel critically discussed the possibilities of reparative justice in and through education in the context of education’s enduring complicity with coloniality and racism. Speakers addressed connections between education as a site of memory, the case for climate reparations and indigenous and feminist perspectives. We invite you to learn more about the discussion thanks to the recording available here.

Jueves 18 de febrero, 15:00-16:30 (Hora de París)

Este seminario web coorganizada con la Oficina del Enviado del Secretario General para la Juventud (Naciones Unidas) explora cómo la educación indígena y el conocimiento tradicional a una educación más relevante e inclusiva, y cómo pueden contribuir al futuro que queremos. 

Cientos de personas se unieron a un grupo de 5 líderes comprometidos en el campo de los derechos de los pueblos indígenas en torno a la cuestión de Los futuros de la educación y los conocimientos indígenas. Nos complace invitarlo a conocer más sobre sus discusiones a través de esta grabación.

English version

Thursday 18th February, 3pm - 4.30pm (Paris time)

This webinar co-organized by the Office of the Envoy of the Secretary-General for Youth (United Nations) and UNESCO explores how indigenous education and traditional knowledge make education more relevant and inclusive, and how they can contribute to the future we want.

Hundreds of people joined a group of 5 committed leaders in the field of indigenous peoples' rights around the issue of the Futures of the education and indigenous knowledge. We are pleased to invite you to learn more about their discussions through this recording.

Wednesday 17h February, 12 – 13:30 (GMT)

This online event is part of a series of webinars on the topic of decolonising education for sustainable futures convened by the UNESCO Chair in inclusive, good quality education and the Centre for Comparative and International Research in Education (CIRE) at the University of Bristol. The aim of this series is to consider how ideas about the future of education can benefit from current efforts to decolonise education. Using an open, roundtable approach, this event aimed to bring together policy, practitioner and academic communities. It included a panel of speakers with plenty of time for audience participation in the spirit of dialogue.

This panel addressed how activists and organisations have been reimagining education. Representing different perspectives and nascent and more established practice speakers have demonstrated how they are learning from anti-colonial and anti-racist struggles. We invite you to learn more about the discussion thanks to the recording available here.

Wednesday 10th February, 12 – 13:30 (GMT)

This online event is part of a series of webinars on the topic of decolonising education for sustainable futures convened by the UNESCO Chair in inclusive, good quality education and the Centre for Comparative and International Research in Education (CIRE) at the University of Bristol. The aim of this series is to consider how ideas about the future of education can benefit from current efforts to decolonise education. Using an open, roundtable approach, this event aimed to bring together policy, practitioner and academic communities. It included a panel of speakers with plenty of time for audience participation in the spirit of dialogue.

This first webinar served as an introductory session that introduced the Futures of Education initiative and set out some of the theoretical and political connections between the decolonial and environmental justice agendas in education. We invite you to learn more about the discussion thanks to the recording available here.

Tuesday 2nd February 2021, 10am Kingston time (-5 GMT)

This fourth webinar of the Caribbean Futures of Education series addressed issues of access in the Caribbean education system. Key questions included: How do cultural factors affect the ability of Caribbean SIDS to engage in knowledge sharing and collaboration towards solving systemic problems such as crime, corruption and reducing inequality? What measures can schools in the region implementing to reduce inequality among their students? How can school systems encourage full access and inclusive practices within the framework of learning? What role can marginalized groups play in the design and implementation of the curriculum within the countries in the Caribbean Region?

Learn more about the discussion by watching the recording here below:
 

Tuesday 26th January 2021, 10am Kingston time (-5 GMT)

How can secure employment and stable income in the Caribbean labor market be established?

This 3rd Webinar of the Caribbean Futures of Education series addressed how new technologies in education can be used to flexibly prepare Caribbean citizens for the rapidly changing labor market, especially in light of the automation of work and the growing dominance of the "gig economy”.

Learn more about the discussion by watching the recording here below:
 

Friday 22nd January 2021, 9:30-10:30, EST/Toronto time

Co-organized by York International and the UNESCO Chair in Reorienting Education Towards Sustainability in cooperation with the International Association of Universities (IAU), the Canadian Commission for UNESCO (CCU) and Okayama University (Japan)

Tuesday 19th January 2021, 10am Kingston time (-5 GMT)

Organized by UNESCO's Cluster Office for the Caribbean

Looking ahead, what are the core competencies and skills that young people in the Caribbean need to thrive in the twenty-first century? What national educational goals, policies, and curricula would help promote those skills? How do Caribbean states address civic issues such as civil rights, civic responsibilities, and norms of shared living in their curricula?

Learn more about the discussion by watching the recording here below:
 

Jueves 14 de enero 2021, 11am (Santiago de Chile / -3 GMT)

Este seminario web ha sido organizado por la Oficina Regional de Educación de la UNESCO para América Latina y el Caribe, en asociación con la Fundación Santillana.

¿Qué papel juega hoy la educación en la garantía de un trabajo decente y en la seguridad económica de las personas y las sociedades? ¿Cómo pueden la educación y el aprendizaje a lo largo de la vida ayudar a navegar los cambios en la naturaleza del trabajo? ¿Qué tipo de competencias y de habilidades sociales y conductuales son necesarias para acompañar la formación dentro de los sistemas de aprendizaje?

Obtenga más información sobre la discusión consultando la grabación del seminario web a continuación.

Friday 11th December, 1pm GMT & Thursday 7th January, 4.30pm GMT

Co-organized by Columbia University’s Teachers College and NISSEM, the panel of speakers tackled a series of questions in order to reflect about civic responsibility, pedagogy and textbooks in a time of rapid change: How is change conceptualized in different parts of the world? How, if at all, should we profoundly rethink education & learning? What is the role of curricula & textbooks in preparing for ambiguous futures?

Learn more about the discussion by watching the recordings here below:
 

Discussion of Friday 11th December:

Discussion of Thursday 7th January:

Tuesday 8th December, 3pm Beijing time

This event has been co-organized by UNESCO, the Ministry of Education of the People's Republic of China and the National Commission of the People's Republic of China for UNESCO. It focused on the futures of education in the light of challenges and opportunities of AI: how will AI shape the future of humanity and education? This webinar also provided the opportunity to review the implications of AI for the inclusion, equity, and quality of learning. Learn more about this special session and the Forum by exploring the official website of the Forum.

Tuesday 8th December, 10am Kingston time (-5 GMT)

This webinar (organized by UNESCO's Cluster Office for the Caribbean, in collaboration with the UNESCO Education Sector) adressed the challenges and roles of the education system of integrating human ecology in the Caribbean curricula to induce environmental change for sustainability. How do Caribbean states address complex issues of human ecology such as climate change, pollution, and conservation in their curricula? How does Caribbean culture promote or hinder efforts to produce environmentally aware students?

Learn more about the discussion by watching the recording here below:
 

El 2 de diciembre, 11h (Santiago de Chile / -3 GMT)

¿Cómo concebir y respetar el conocimiento como un bien común mundial? ¿Cómo considerar, en y a través de la educación, las distintas voces y los conocimientos locales e indígenas? ¿Cómo fomentar el intercambio intercultural y la pluralidad y fluidez de los conocimientos, tratando al mismo tiempo las asimetrías persistentes? ¿Cómo volver más inclusiva y democrática la investigación científica y otros procesos de generación, intercambio y aplicación de conocimientos, para que sean más transparentes, localizables y participativos? 

Obtenga más información sobre la discusión que tuvo lugar con la Oficina Regional de Educación de la UNESCO para América Latina y el Caribe, en asociación con la Fundación Santillana, consultando la grabación del seminario web a continuación.
 

El 16 de octubre, 11h (Santiago de Chile / -3 GMT)

¿Cómo fomentar el ejercicio de una ciudadanía participativa, activa, responsable y comprometida en y a través de la educación? ¿Cómo puede la educación reforzar la capacidad de participar y liderar procesos de construcción de acción colectiva transformativa y fortalecer el compromiso con los valores y principios democráticos, incluido el respeto del pluralismo, la diversidad, la igualdad de género, la paz, la emancipación intelectual y la libertad de pensamiento y expresión? Obtenga más información sobre la discusión que tuvo lugar con la Oficina Regional de Educación de la UNESCO para América Latina y el Caribe, en asociación con la Fundación Santillana, consultando la grabación del seminario web a continuación.

 

Thursday 24 September 2020

Technological and political transformations have impacted the world of work, disrupting the traditional bonds between companies and workers and also the worker's own relationship with their activities. Revolution brings changes that affect the entire social fabric, both because of the advancement of the internet of things, which tends to automate different activities, and because of the displacement of the place of work in everyday life. The so-called “uberization” is one of the current characteristics of the relations between the worker and the companies, which defy the laws around the world. 

What does this mean for the futures of education? We invite you to learn more about the discussion that was co-organized with UNESCO Brasília, the UNESCO Regional Bureau for Education in Latin America and the Caribbean, and Fundación Santillana. You can watch the event recording (available here below) and/or consult the detailed discussions report, which is available here (in Portuguese).

 

Thursday 10 September 2020

According to international indicators, Brazil from 2011 to 2016 reached the tenth position in global scientific production, among more than 190 countries. With the expansion of opportunities for access to higher education, different segments of the Brazilian population reached the highest levels of training academic as indigenous researchers, and black and black intellectuals from diverse social backgrounds.

Yet, recently, Brazilian research faces difficulties resulting from the cut of resources, scholarships and the closure of programs. Just over a year ago, ten ex-ministers from the area expressed “deep concern at the threats with respect to Education. The drastic budget cuts are worsening, which could lead to a step backwards without parallel in the history of Brazilian Science, an essential and critical area, both for economic and social development and for national sovereignty ”.

What does this mean for the futures of education? We invite you to learn more about the discussion that was co-organized with UNESCO Brasília, the UNESCO Regional Bureau for Education in Latin America and the Caribbean, and Fundación Santillana. You can watch the event recording (available here below) and/or consult the detailed discussions report, which is available here (in Portuguese).

 

Tuesday 8th of September 2020, (5 pm, GMT/UTC +3)

The virtual round table "Digital Technologies and Futures of Education", co-organized by UNESCO Institute for Information Technologies in Education and UNESCO’s Education Research and Foresight Programme, focused on lessons learnt broadly from the COVID-19, opportunities and risks of technification of education, new competencies and models of their shaping. A certain number of leading Russian experts gathered to explore ongoing and emerging fundamental transformations in education which will impact society, politics, economy and culture and lead to further economic, technological and socio-cultural changes.

Panelists included Mr Kirill Barannikov (Vice-Rector for Development, Moscow City Pedagogical University), Ms Lyubov Dukhanina (Chair, National Nuclear Research University; Member of the State Duma of the Russian Federation), Mr Isak Froumin (Head, Institute of Education, State Research University – Higher School of Economics), Mr Pavel Luksha (Professor, Moscow School of Management Skolkovo), Ms Marina Rakova (Vice-President of Sberbank, Head of Digital Education Platform Division), Mr Alexander M. Sidorkin (Dean, College of Education, California State University, Sacramento) and Mr Artem Soloveichik (Editor-in-Chief, Publishing House “Pervoye Sentyabrya”). 

Please note that a detailed report of the webinar is available here, as well as a news item, in addition to the recording here below:

 

Wednesday 2nd September, 11h (Santiago de Chile time)

We are at a crucial moment in tackling one of the greatest challenges of our time: climate change. Climate change poses serious risks to all societies globally. However, these risks are unevenly distributed, disproportionately affecting the most vulnerable groups, such as indigenous peoples, local communities, and the inhabitants of rural areas and island territories. 

This webinar was the first one of a series of four online dialogues co-organized by the UNESCO Regional Bureau for Education in Latin America and the Caribbean and Fundación Santillana, and it started with the topic Human and Planetary Sustainability. To tackle this important matter, various panelists took part in the discussion, including Ms. Tarcila Rivera Zea, Executive Director, Centro de Culturas Indígenas del Perú and member of the International Commission on the Futures of Education; Ms. Lola Huete Machado, Director of Planet Future (Diario El País); Bernardo Toro, philosopher and advisor of the Presidency of Fundación Avina, and Enrique Leff, from the Instituto de investigaciones sociales UNAM.

 

Thursday 27 August, 11am (Brasilia time)

How to promote citizenship and participation from and through education? How can education encourage the participation of students and other members of the school community? Brazilian educator Anísio Teixeira (1900-1971), who celebrated his 120th birthday in July this year, recalled that the school is a place where one lives: it is at school that the first steps are taken to build citizenship, by participating in activities that require dialogue, respect for differences and rules of coexistence. 

This webinar is the second one of a series of four online dialogues co-organized with UNESCO Brasília, the UNESCO Regional Bureau for Education in Latin America and the Caribbean, and Fundación Santillana. Four panelists tackled this important matter during the webinar: Antonio Nóvoa – Ph.D. in Education, Member of the International Committee on the Futures of Education; Gina Vieira Ponte de Albuquerque – Teacher in Basic Education from Education Secretariat of Federal District; Diego Caligari – Representing Civil Society; Neca Setubal – Sociologist, GIFE President (a group of Foundations, Institutes, and private organizations) and, Tide Setubal Foundation ( Educational foundation).

We invite you to learn more about the discussion that was co-organized with UNESCO Brasília, the UNESCO Regional Bureau for Education in Latin America and the Caribbean, and Fundación Santillana. You can watch the event recording (available here below) and/or consult the detailed discussions report, which is available here (in Portuguese).

 

13 August 2020, 11 am - 12.30 pm (Brasília time)

What role does education play in assuming collective and collaborative responsibility in relation to ecology and the promotion of sustainable living on the planet? How can human capacities be directed towards improving the quality of human life, while respecting the ecosystems that sustain them? To these general issues, it is necessary to add the specific perspective of Brazil, a continental country and responsible for one of the largest and most important forests on the planet, composed of a wide ethnic and cultural diversity.

This webinar, focusing on Human and Planetary Sustainability, is the first one of a series of four online dialogues co-organized with UNESCO Brasília, the UNESCO Regional Bureau for Education in Latin America and the Caribbean, and Fundación Santillana. Cristovam Buarque, Emeritus Professor at the University of Brasília and member of the International Commission, facilitated the discussion between Célia Xacriabá, indigenous teacher and activist; Marina Silva, teacher, environmentalist and politician; and Ricardo Abramovay, sociologist and professor of the Environmental Science program.

We invite you to learn more about the discussion that was co-organized with UNESCO Brasília, the UNESCO Regional Bureau for Education in Latin America and the Caribbean, and Fundación Santillana. You can watch the event recording (available here below) and/or consult the detailed discussions report, which is available here (in Portuguese).

 

16 June 2020, 12pm - 2pm (Beirut time), 1pm - 3pm (UAE time)

UNESCO Regional Bureau for Education in the Arab States (UNESCO Beirut), in partnership with UNESCO HQ and the Regional Center for Educational Planning (RCEP), organized on 16 June 2020 an Arab Region Dialogue on the Future of Education after COVID-19. The webinar aimed to examine the impact of COVID-19 on educational continuity in the Arab region, to reflect on the lessons learnt from the challenges faced during the COVID-19 crisis as we look to the futures of education, as well as to explore plans and strategies proposed to frame the vision of education after COVID-19.

The event was attended by high-level personalities including H.E. Hussain Ibrahim Al Hammadi, UAE Minister of Education, UNESCO Beirut Director Dr Hamed al Hammami, RCEP Director Dr Mahra AlMutawiei, and Dr Sobhi Tawil, Chief of Section for Education Research and Foresight at UNESCO HQ; it has been followed by 500 participants online.

A full, 30-page synthesis report on the webinar is available here.

 

20 May 2020, 15h00-16h00 (Paris time)

What deep and fundamental transformations are possible for the future organization of societies, politics, economies, and even cultures?  What role can education play to facilitate these transformations? The current global pandemic has changed anticipated futures around the world. With the COVID-19 crisis there is a widely shared feeling that humanity is at a decisive moment and can rethink the future. This 20 May 2020 Francophone webinar centered around the possible fundamental societal, political, economic and cultural transformations and their impact on education.

Panelists were UNESCO Assistant-Director General for Education, Stefania Giannini and three members of the International Commission on the Futures of Education, former President of Latvia Vaira Vike-Freiberga, the president of the Arab Institute for Human Rights Abdelbasset Ben Hassen and António Nóvoa, current ambassador of Portugal to UNESCO. 
 

FR Webinar

Click here to view the full recording of the webinar (in French)

20 April 2020, 11h00-12h30 (Santiago time)

The repercussions and consequences produced by the global pandemic have highlighted the increasingly pressing need to rethink the probable, possible and alternative futures that humanity could face, including the futures of education.

This webinar, co-organized with the UNESCO Regional Bureau for Education in Latin America and the Caribbean and Fundación Santillana, addressed issues related to the importance and relevance of formal education that is taught in the traditional school environment, the participation of fathers, mothers and communities, and its change during the health pandemic, the future of distance learning and its role in the transformation of education and in the fight against growing inequalities in educational opportunities.

Three members of the International Commission on the Futures of Education sparked the conversation with over 800 attendees: Elisa Guerra, founder of Colegio Valle from Philadelphia in Mexico; Tarcila Rivera, Executive Director of the Center for Indigenous Cultures of Peru; and. Antonio Nóvoa, current ambassador of Portugal to UNESCO.

 

24 March 2020 15h00-16h30 (Paris time)

The fact that we live in a world of increasing complexity, uncertainty, and precarity has become undeniably evident because of the COVID-19 crisis.  Events around the globe are being shifted online, including a 24 March keynote panel that was to be held at the Comparative and International Education Society’s (CIES) annual conference in Miami.

Four members of the International Commission on the Futures of Education took part in the discussion with the audience: Arjun Appadurai, Professor, New York University, and Hertie School (Germany); Fernando M. Reimers, Professor, Harvard Graduate School of Education (USA); Karen Mundy, Professor, Ontario Institute for the Study of Education (Canada) and António Nóvoa, Ambassador of Portugal to UNESCO.

Though all four panelists spoke at length about the dangers and uncertainties that the current global health crisis presents, there was also firm agreement that this is a potent moment of great opportunity as well. 

 

 

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